Salmorejo Means Summer

Recently I was in Seville with my nephew.  It was his first time in Spain.  He's a major carnivore, so I thought jamon would be a revelation to him.  I ordered it for him that first day, opting for salmorejo for myself, as I don't eat jamon.   The jamon stayed on the plate, and I despite my best efforts, I could not keep the salmorejo to myself once he'd tried it.  It became part of breakfast, lunch and dinner.  The same thing happened when we were filming in Spain.  The crew just wanted salmorejo, the emblematic dish of Andalusia, a simplified gazpacho with a lot more olive oil!   You'll learn a lot about salmorejo in the film, but before that, here's the recipe from my friend Ana in Granada.  She's in the film for a bit, and she showed my nephew how to make salmorejo while we stayed with her this summer: 

Salmorejo recipe

Ingredients:

1 kg (around 2 .2 1bs—no need to be specific) of perfectly ripe tomatos, roughly cut.

100 grs. White bread country style, day old (one big French baguette)

½ C. extra virgin olive oil

1 clove peeled garlic (more than enough!)

Salt to Taste

2 T. apple cider vinegar  (you might like a little more or less)

Preparation:

Wash and roughly cut the tomatoes.  Process in the blender into juice.  After that, you can put through sieve to remove seeds and skin.  Remember, only to get a special texture, but will not change the flavor,and in my opinion is a waste of time.  In the blender, add the bread, tornup, olive oil, garlic and salt. Decorate with chopped boiled egg and Serrano jamon cut in small cubes or cucumbers (my option).   It tastes better if it sits in fridge for a few hours first.  You can eat cold or at room temperature.

 Salmorejo Joy

Salmorejo Joy